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Evaluation and Promotion

American Board of Surgery for examination, if their professional achievements indicate that they are prepared to assume additional responsibility in surgical training, or in the case of graduating Chief Residents, if they are determined to be properly prepared for initial entry into unsupervised practice as a specialist in Surgery. This determination is made by the Chairman and the Program Director based on all available data, and upon recommendation of the Surgical Faculty.

The Program Goals and Objectives and the General Competencies as defined by the ACGME Residency Review Committee for Surgery form the objective criteria for determining if a resident is prepared for promotion or recommendation for board examination. Upon completion of residency training; residents should be competent in the following six areas at the level expected of a surgical practitioner.

  1. Patient Care that is compassionate, appropriate, and effective for the treatment of health problems and the promotion of health. Surgical residents must: demonstrate manual dexterity appropriate for their training level and be able to develop and execute patient care plans.
  2. Medical Knowledge about established and evolving biomedical, clinical, and cognate (e.g. epidemiological and social-behavioral) sciences and the application of this knowledge to patient care. Surgical residents are expected to: critically evaluate and demonstrate knowledge of pertinent scientific Residents are promoted, or in the case of graduating Chief Residents are recommended to the information.
  3. Practice-Based Learning and Improvement that involves investigation and evaluation of their own patient care, appraisal and assimilation of scientific evidence, and improvements in patient care. Surgical residents are expected to: critique personal practice outcomes and demonstrate a recognition of the importance of lifelong learning in surgical practice.
  4. Interpersonal and Communication Skills that result in effective information exchange and teaming with patients, their families, and other health professionals. Surgical residents are expected to: communicate effectively with other health care professionals, counsel and educate patients and families, and effectively document practice activities.
  5. Professionalism, as manifested through a commitment to carrying out professional responsibilities, adherence to ethical principles, and sensitivity to a diverse patient population. Surgical residents are expected to: maintain high standards of ethical behavior, demonstrate a commitment to continuity of patient care, and demonstrate sensitivity to age, gender and culture of patients and other health care professionals.
  6. Systems-Based Practice as manifested by actions that demonstrate an awareness of and response to the larger context and system of health care and effectively call on system resources to provide optimal care. Surgical residents are expected to: practice high quality, cost effective patient care; demonstrate a knowledge of risk-benefit analysis; and demonstrate an understanding of the role of different specialists and other health care professionals in overall patient management.

The following specific conditions apply to resident continuation, promotion and recommendation for examination:

  1. The American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) is taken annually by all residents. A score of greater than the 30th percentile on the ABSITE is supportive evidence that the resident is academically prepared to assume additional responsibility in surgical training. Residents must score higher than the 14th percentile in the Chief Resident year to be recommended to the American Board of Surgery for the examination process.
  2. Residents must demonstrate appropriate progress in technical, intellectual and maturational development to be considered for promotion or recommendation for board examination.
  3. Residents must have accumulated and properly recorded an operative case experience that is appropriate for their level of training to be considered for promotion or recommended for board examination.
  4. Residents must have addressed to the satisfaction of the Chairman and program director any issues that have led to probation, academic warning or other sanction before being considered for promotion or recommended for board examination.
    Residents who are deficient in academic or professional development may be placed on academic warning status or probation, as appropriate. Academic warning status and probation are warnings to the resident that improvement is required, and lack of improvement may result in dismissal from surgical training or other sanction.

Residents who do not qualify for promotion or recommendation for board examination may, at the discretion of the Department of Surgery, be offered an opportunity for remedial training, an unpaid leave of absence for study or a deferred recommendation to the American Board of Surgery (if warranted by subsequent improved academic performance). Residents who are not qualified for promotion may be denied re-appointment to the surgical residency program, if the resident has been unsuccessful in remediation or if remediation is not considered appropriate for a particular problem.